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Posted by Maryann Clancy on 8/2/2019

There are both younger and older Millennials today willing to purchase a home but want a realtor to guide them through the process due to a couple of mistakes they are afraid of committing. The most surprising thing about how Millennials buy homes is that they want a realtor to guide them through the process, because everyone, buyers as well as sellers, wants to make the right financial decisions, to avoid real estate regret and unnecessary pressure from high market conditions. 

However, what can Millennials do to avoid real estate regret? Although most people could think of driving around the area all day to get an idea of what the market is like, it is essential to get advice from someone with some experience and your interest in mind to help you avoid future complaints and nagging. As a result, many make such big decisions with their parents:

Parents have experience

With the interest of mortgage rates going higher and home prices increasing altogether. Parents could come in rescue with financial assistance and thus, try to have a share of buying decisions from the location of such property to the pricing and size.

Most times, your parentsí perspective on decision-making might seem different from yours, or you could perceive it to be biased and no relation to your situation and taste. Irrespective of this, endeavor to heed to their advice as it turns out in most times to be a wise approach.

Listen when they point out to you that the property might be overpriced

You could find a property and think it is the perfect one for you. They could be in an expensive area with multiple school districts, or have a lower level of crime rate due to tight security. They might be energy-efficient during the winter and so would save you money monthly. As a result of these advantages, you might think all these concessions are worth paying more without further negotiation. With your parents by your side with more experience, they can spot a problem or fault with the same property you're looking at and help you to use it as a bargaining chip.

Conversing openly with your parents on topics like real estate plans, money, and wills may seem difficult and awkward to you. But it will be wise of you to do so as real estate comes with a lot of different options and problems. Whatever the case may be, prepare yourself and start talking to them when making such a decision to support and guide you through. 

If your parents are part of your real estate decision-making process, make certain to introduce them to your real estate agent so that you're all on the same page.




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Posted by Maryann Clancy on 2/8/2019

It's easy to get stuck without a mortgage approval or with a smaller home loan than you want, just because you don't understand how your credit score works. Most of the things you've done to prepare: budgeting your income, balancing your bank accounts and saving up for a down payment, aren't reflected in your FICO credit score. It doesn't even show how much you can afford.

So whatís the point of your credit score?

It tells your lender what youíve done with your previous credit. Whether anyone has been willing to lend you money, how long youíve kept it and whether you pay it back on time. They keep the actual algorithm at FICO secret, but there are two main factors that you can affect.

Late Payments

These are easy to understand and fix. Ready? Pay them on time. Thatís it. Each time you are late on a debt payment, whether itís a credit card, school loan, mortgage, or car loan it dings your credit score. Thatís the easy part. Now for some finance math.

Debt to Credit Ratio

Surprisingly, you are in complete control of this part of your score too. While it sounds like this is a ratio of how much you owe to how much you make, it's not. The debt-to-credit ratio shows how much you owe based on how much credit you currently have available. That means if you have a $5000 credit card, and your friend has a $2000 credit card, and you both OWE $2000, you will have a higher score than your friend because your ratio ($2000/$5000) is lower than hers ($2000/$2000). The higher this ratio gets, the less likely lenders are to give you more credit. Most professionals suggest you try to keep your usage below 30%. That means your balance on that $5000 credit card should stay below $1500. This practice works better for you as well, keeping some cushion in your accounts for emergencies.

Managing your Debt-to-Credit Ratio

There are a few tricks beyond merely using less of your credit to help keep this number under control. First off, pay off as much of your debt as possible. You want to keep that used debt down as low as possible when trying to apply for new debt. Second, don't close your paid-off accounts. While it may seem like the optimal thing to do, remember that total credit number? You want to keep that number high so that your used credit appears lower. So, you've paid off that credit card? Great! Now chop it up or put it in a hidden drawer and keep that available credit without using it. Lastly, be careful about opening new accounts. While it lowers your debt-to-credit ratio as long as you donít actually spend from them, your score also reflects the age of your accounts. The longer ago you applied for and got credit, the more likely it is you will qualify for new credit. Donít waste that new credit qualification on anything else besides your home loan.

Want to know the best lenders to apply with once you've got the best score? Ask your real estate agent for their top recommendations for your situation and use their expertise to ease the qualification process.





Posted by Maryann Clancy on 4/15/2016

In today's economic climate protecting your financial health is more important than ever. From health insurance to your plans for retirement, thereís a lot to consider. Here are some tips from Family Wealth Management Group, LLC to help protect your assets and financial future. It is never too early to plan In order to plan, you need to know what you have. Review your pension plan, 401 (k), IRAs, Social Security benefits and other savings plans to assess whether they meet your long-term retirement goals and will generate an income stream to meet your projected expenses. Curb spending Time to take an inventory on how much you spend. Keep a log on trips to the market, afternoon lattes, dry cleaning and all of your miscellaneous spending. Try to eliminate a portion of these expenses. Once you track them you will realize you are spending more than you thought. Re-define your financial goals Ask yourself where you see yourself in five, 10 or 15 years. See if it is possible to redefine your goals. You may be able to retire earlier or pay for college. Set goals to achieve the things you want. Get help Professional advice about investment losses, financial products, insurance coverage and other important issues will help you make the right choices for your current financial situation.




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